Aloe Vera and Night Sweats.

image Scientists have found that compounds in Aloe Vera have an antiviral effect, killed cancer cells, reduced the growth rate of tumors, protected the body against free radicals, and helped with allergies.

Aloe Vera has also been shown to activate whites blood cells and promotes growth of non-cancerous cells apparent cancer fighting properties. Trails on HIV/AIDS patients showed that fever and night sweats, diarrhea and opportunistic infections (which are usually responsible for the death of the AIDS patient) were controlled or eliminated in most patients.

IT is fast becoming the most courted plant on Earth. It is employed in making most household daily care products from toothpastes, cosmetics to healthful drinks. The Aloe Vera plant has a long history of healing power. Its ability to heal burns and cuts and soothe pain has been documented as far back as the 10th century.

Legend has it that Cleopatra used Aloe Vera to keep her skin soft. The modern use of Aloe Vera was first recognised in the 1930s to heal radiation burns. Since then, it has been a common ingredient in ointments that heal sunburn, minor cuts, skin irritation, and many other ailments.

Recently, Aloe Vera has gained some popularity as an active ingredient in tooth gel and healthful drinks. Researchers have shown that drinking Aloe Vera juice boosts immune system against cancer and Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

A recent study published in General Dentistry, the Academy of General Dentistry’s (AGD) clinical, peer-reviewed journal, suggests that similar to its use on skin, the Aloe Vera in tooth gels is used to cleanse and soothe teeth and gums, and is as effective as toothpaste to fight cavities.

Aloe Vera tooth gel is intended to perform the same function as toothpaste, which is to eliminate pathogenic oral microflora Ð disease-causing bacteria Ð in the mouth. The ability of Aloe Vera tooth gel to successfully perform that function has been a point of contention for some dental professionals. However, research presented in General Dentistry may alleviate that concern.

The study compared the germ-fighting ability of an Aloe Vera tooth gel to two commercially popular toothpastes and revealed that the aloe Vera tooth gel was just as effective, and in some cases more effective, than the commercial brands at controlling cavity-causing organisms.

Scientists have found that compounds in Aloe Vera have an antiviral effect, killed cancer cells, reduced the growth rate of tumors, protected the body against free radicals, and helped with allergies.

Aloe Vera has also been shown to activate whites blood cells and promotes growth of non-cancerous cells apparent cancer fighting properties. Trails on HIV/AIDS patients showed that fever and night sweats, diarrhea and opportunistic infections (which are usually responsible for the death of the AIDS patient) were controlled or eliminated in most patients.

It has been shown that Aloe Vera is one of the most potent sources of antioxidants, Vitamins E and C and Vitamin B-12. Recent studies are demonstrating the remarkable benefits of anti-oxidants. Oxidation in cells can damage DNA, leading sometimes to cancer, other diseases and, to the changes associated with aging. Anti-oxidant compounds have been shown to counter the aging effects wrought by the free radicals. People drinking Aloe Vera regularly were shown to suffer less from life threatening diseases and overall live about 10 per cent longer life.

Dr. Dilip George, co-author of the General Dentistry study, explained that aloe "must not be treated with excessive heat or filtered during the manufacturing process, as this destroys or reduces the effects of certain essential compounds, such as enzymes and polysaccharides."

George said that consumers consult non-profit associations such as the International Aloe Science Council to see what products have received the organization’s seal of quality.

Although there are more than 300 species of the plant, only a few have been used for medicinal purposes. "Thankfully, consumers with sensitive teeth or gums have a number of choices when it comes to their oral health, and Aloe Vera is one of them," said AGD spokesperson Eric Shapria. "If they are interested in a more alternative approach to oral hygiene, they should speak with their dentist to ensure that it meets the standards of organised dentistry, too."

Nutritionists recommend Aloe Vera-based drinks for optimal health. National Secretary, Nutrition Society of Nigeria (NSN), Mr. Barth Brai, said Aloe Vera-based health drink will provide refreshment and health benefits to the consumers.

Brai decried the reckless eating and drinking habits of most consumers who are not conscious of what they eat and drinks, a practice he said has lead to various hitherto foreign diseases like cancer and hypertension becoming rampant in the society.

He said that Aloe Vera could reverse the damage done to the body by free radicals. ÒBotanical products like Aloe Vera-based drinks provide specific health benefits like aiding of digestion, enhancing clear skin and reduction of blood cholesterol levels thus guarding against the risk of hypertension and other cardio-vascular diseases,Ó Brai said.

Brai spoke during a courtesy call by top executives of Chi Pharmaceuticals Limited, marketers of Chivera and Chivera plus (Aloe Vera-based drinks), to the head office of NSN.

Meanwhile, researchers have warned people to beware of the damage that acidic beverages have on teeth. Yet, for some, the damage and problems associated with drinking sodas, citric juices or certain tea may have already begun to take effect. The question remains: What can be done to restore teeth already affected?

In a recent study that appeared in General Dentistry, the AGD’s clinical, peer-reviewed journal, lead author, Prof. Mohamed A. Bassiouny, outlined the acidic content of beverages, such as soda; lemon, grapefruit and orange juice; green and black tea; and revealed three steps to rehabilitate teeth that suffer from dental erosion as a result of the excessive consumption of these products.

Bassiouny instructs those who are experiencing tooth erosion to first, identify the culprit source of erosion, possibly with the help of a dental professional. Then, the individual should determine and understand how this source affects the teeth in order to implement measures to control and prevent further damage. Lastly, the person should stop or reduce consumption of the suspected food or beverage to the absolute minimum. He notes that information about the acid content of commonly consumed foods or beverages is usually available online or on the product’s label. It is also recommended to seek professional dental advice in order to possibly restore the damaged tissues.

"Dental erosion," according to Bassiouny, "is a demineralisation process that affects hard dental tissues (such as enamel and dentin)." This process causes tooth structure to wear away due to the effects that acid has on teeth, which eventually leads to their breakdown. It can be triggered by consumption of carbonated beverages or citric juices with a low potential of hydrogen (pH), which measures the acidity of a substance. Excessive consumption of the acidic beverages over a prolonged period of time may pose a risk factor for dental health.

"Some may not even realise a problem exists when their teeth are in the early stages of dental erosion," said Dr. Kenton Ross, a spokesperson for the AGD. "Without proper diagnosis by a general dentist, more serious oral health issues could occur."

"Visiting your general dentists twice a year can help maintain healthy teeth as well as uncover and prevent future problems," said Ross.

http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/

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